probably the best article with which to start if you want to understand what’s going on in the holy land.

22 hours ago on 27 Jul 2014
themorningnews:


If it all plays out as expected and budgeted, astronomers of the 2020s will be swimming in petabytes of data streaming from space and the ground. Herewith a report card on the future of big-time stargazing.

More Eyes on the Skies

cool article about telescopes in the making.

themorningnews:

If it all plays out as expected and budgeted, astronomers of the 2020s will be swimming in petabytes of data streaming from space and the ground. Herewith a report card on the future of big-time stargazing.

More Eyes on the Skies

cool article about telescopes in the making.

♥ 400 — 22 hours ago on 27 Jul 2014 — via we-are-star-stuff (source)

strange desire feels really important. can’t really think of a better word to describe it. important. or put my finger on the exact emotion it invokes. it’s a series of emotions, really. maybe sort of a simultaneous longing and a belonging. and can’t really pick a favorite track because each feels necessary and almost equally important. to use that word again. terrible-thrills.

♥ 1 — 1 day ago on 27 Jul 2014

finally got my bleachers stuff in the mail today. I’ve only listened to the album 5+ times already…

1 day ago on 26 Jul 2014

toopaletofunction:

staythatswhatimeanttosay:

One nation, under Canada, above Mexico.

with liberty and justice for some 

♥ 94776 — 2 days ago on 25 Jul 2014 — via fractionalrabbits (source)
rookiemag:
We Are What We Love: An Interview With Laverne Cox

The Orange is the New Black star and all-around superwoman on being yourself. By Kelli Korducki. Collage by Minna.

rookiemag:

We Are What We Love: An Interview With Laverne Cox

The Orange is the New Black star and all-around superwoman on being yourself. By Kelli Korducki. Collage by Minna.

♥ 431 — 6 days ago on 21 Jul 2014 — via rookiemag

if you haven’t watched this yet, you’re missing out.

1 week ago on 18 Jul 2014

nuditea:

atheistblowjob:

nuditea:

straight women who casually use the word “girlfriend” to refer to their platonic lady friends, i have nothing against you, but you make the world really confusing,

I love this because it means that just a little, heteronormativity has decreased

i think a woman who would never say “boyfriend” to refer to a platonic male friend using the word “girlfriend” for a platonic female friend and assuming everyone will know it is a non-romantic relationship evidently by very nature of it being between two women is actually kind of the definition of heteronormativity

♥ 252874 — 1 week ago on 18 Jul 2014 — via lgbtlaughs (source)

underthesunset91:

When you have a connection with someone, it never really goes away. You snap back to being important to each other because you still are.

♥ 4370 — 1 week ago on 16 Jul 2014 — via underthesunset91

angryplum:

shsl-pornstar:

man i wish homophobic people were actually AFRAID of gay people like could you imagine having the power to strike fear in peoples hearts with your homo

"If I do not have one trazillion dollars on my doorstep by noon tomorrow, I swear I will KISS THIS WOMAN on the MOUTH in front of your children.”

♥ 297408 — 1 week ago on 16 Jul 2014 — via lgbtlaughs (source)
♥ 87 — 1 week ago on 15 Jul 2014 — via fuckyeahbleachersrumors (source)
♥ 69410 — 1 week ago on 14 Jul 2014 — via lgbtlaughs (source)

a little late to the party, but I finally watched (and finished) orange is the new black

damn, that shit is good.

2 weeks ago on 10 Jul 2014
♥ 114 — 2 weeks ago on 08 Jul 2014 — via ihatebleachers
ucresearch:
An invisible force at the center of our galaxy
Scientists have theorized that our Milky Way galaxy has a super massive black hole at the center of it, but how did this idea come about?  How do astronomers measure something that has actually never been seen in our telescopes?
Above is an animation of star movements in our galaxy over the past 16 years.  They all orbit around a point that emits no light in our galaxy.  We can measure the mass of these stars and calculate that their orbits require an object with the mass of 4 million Suns.  So far this points to a super massive black hole in our galaxy.
Read more about how galaxies obtain these supermassive objects →

ucresearch:

An invisible force at the center of our galaxy

Scientists have theorized that our Milky Way galaxy has a super massive black hole at the center of it, but how did this idea come about?  How do astronomers measure something that has actually never been seen in our telescopes?

Above is an animation of star movements in our galaxy over the past 16 years.  They all orbit around a point that emits no light in our galaxy.  We can measure the mass of these stars and calculate that their orbits require an object with the mass of 4 million Suns.  So far this points to a super massive black hole in our galaxy.

Read more about how galaxies obtain these supermassive objects →

♥ 5626 — 2 weeks ago on 07 Jul 2014 — via ucresearch