asapscience:

All three volumes of The Feynman Lectures on Physics are now available for FREE online! (You’re welcome.) 

♥ 157 — 3 days ago on 28 Aug 2014 — via asapscience
asapscience:

Nicolás Lamas, Ideas about the universe, 2013 (via » 11 8_6_2014_1)

asapscience:

Nicolás Lamas, Ideas about the universe, 2013 (via » 11 8_6_2014_1)

♥ 88 — 4 days ago on 27 Aug 2014 — via asapscience

iwilleatyourenglish:

everyone has said and done problematic things in their lifetime. that’s a result of the society we live in, not necessarily a reflection of their character.

what is a reflection of their character is how they react to being informed of the negativity within their behavior and statements, and whether or not they choose to change their behavior.

♥ 136291 — 4 days ago on 27 Aug 2014 — via liefplus (source)

The album is all about moving on: finding ways to move on without becoming overly damaged or overly complicated. I feel like I think about that all the time. How to push on, how to not leave too many of the pieces in the past, how to not take too many of them with you.

♥ 272 — 5 days ago on 26 Aug 2014 — via releasethedoves

Song: I'm Not In Love
Artist: 10cc
Album:
Played: 2498 times

some-good-songs:

I’m Not in Love  »  10cc

I’m not in love
So don’t forget it
It’s just a silly phase I’m going through

♥ 268 — 1 week ago on 23 Aug 2014 — via some-good-songs
♥ 116 — 1 week ago on 23 Aug 2014 — via variationsonfox
Anonymous inquired:

You're post regarding the existence of biological sex... perturbed me, to say the least, given the fact that you only cited intersex people as proof of this. I did some quick research on the subject and I learned that those fitting under the label intersex (not xx or xy, klinefelters, ambiguous genitalia, etc) and I found that such individuals make up around 1%-2% of the human population. As a result I must ask, and please understand this is an honest question, have you ever heard of an outliar?

ailuronymy:

Hello there.

Yes, I have heard of an outlier. I was fortunate enough to receive a high school education in mathematics, which got me fairly well-acquainted with the concept of outliers, multiplication, basic fractions, and Pythagoras’ bloody Theorem, among other things.

Now, please allow me to ask you a question:

Do you realise what you have just said?

It’s not a trick question, by the way. I am legitimately, apprehensively curious as to whether or not you realise exactly what it is you are suggesting to me. 

Did you know there are approximately seven billion people alive in this world right now? Approximately 7,255,000,000, and counting, in fact. 

And since you’re interested in maths, do you know what 1% of that number is?

It’s 72,550,000.

But that was an easy one. Do you know what 2% of that number is?

Of course you do. It’s 145,100,000. 

And do you realise what you have just said?

Would you like to know some other interesting statistics? I’m sure you would have answered yes, because you are a curious mind. Let’s talk about countries.

Did you know that Japan, Vietnam, Seychelles, Greenland, Germany, Australia, Palestine, Mexico, the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic, Switzerland, Afghanistan, South Korea, and France each have populations under 145,100,000 as of the most recent records.

Entire countries with fewer than 145,100,000 inhabitants. 

Did you know that, in fact, only nine countries have over 145,100,000 inhabitants? In order, those countries are China, India, the United States, Indonesia, Brazil, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and Russia. 

And so I will ask one more time, for emphasis: 

Do you realise what you have just said to me? 

I’m sure you know - being so well-versed in mathematics as you are - what happens to outliers. If nothing else, our dear friend Spiders Georg should have shown you what usually happens to outliers.

They do not get counted. They get ignored. They get deleted. 

What you have just said to me is this:

Approximately 145,100,000 people do not count to you. You do not respect them. You do not acknowledge them. You do not care about them. You see them as numbers. You see them as things, not people. You see them as less than yourself. 

I find that suggestion disturbing and repulsive in ways I can scarcely put into words, and frankly, I feel that same repulsion about you by association. What you have said to me is nothing short of disgusting and inhuman. I am so disappointed in you. 

However, you are quite right about me only citing a specifically intersex-oriented website. To be honest, that was because it was an easily accessible, informative read for people on the topic of physiological variation, to prove my point on there variation in the first place, and my thinking was that if people were curious and wanted to learn more about the fantastic spectrum of human existence, they were clever enough to, say, research it for themselves. To use the Google, as the kids these days call it. Perhaps that was a mistake on my part. Perhaps I shouldn’t have assumed that level of independent learning ability.

Seeing that you mentioned it, I assume you have looked into Klinefelter syndrome and ‘ambiguous genitalia’, and I therefore have absolutely no idea why you’re “perturbed” about this. 

The purpose of that post I made was to show that sexual morphology is not as simple as ‘male’ or ‘female’, and neither is it as simple as ‘penis’ or ‘vagina’. Gender is a spectrum, and so is sexual morphology. 

This may or may not come as a surprise to you, depending on whether or not you’ve actually seen other people’s junk, but almost no-one has the same junk as someone else. There is no factory where the Perfect Standard Junk gets made; there is no perfect standard junk. Even for people who are not considered ‘ambiguous’ or intersex, there is a lot of physical variation in every way you can think of, pretty much. 

And it’s all okay. That’s the point of this. 

People should never be shamed for their bodies. They should not be excluded or discriminated against or harmed or in any way made to feel lesser because their body is a bit different from yours. Like, for goodness’ sake. You shouldn’t need for someone to tell you that. 

And yet, here you are, telling me that 145,100,000 people are outliers.

Well, you know what? As far as I’m concerned, that’s 145,100,000 reasons to care about this. 

So it’s time to change your tune or go far, far, far away, you unbelievable wally. It’s your choice now.

♥ 3947 — 1 week ago on 23 Aug 2014 — via lgbtlaughs (source)
teganandsara:

We used to be a cat family. @tilly_bird

teganandsara:

We used to be a cat family. @tilly_bird

♥ 1297 — 1 week ago on 23 Aug 2014 — via teganandsara
Anonymous inquired:

what about Gaza and Ferguson John? do they not deserve your respect? you're such a hypocrite, i's disgusting

fishingboatproceeds:

I think this is a deeply flawed way of looking at the world.

Now, I have talked about Ferguson, and I’ve talked about Gaza. (In fact, I’ve been writing and talking about Israel and Palestine for more than a decade.) But there are many important problems facing the world that I haven’t talked about: I haven’t talked much about the civil war in South Sudan, or the epidemic of suicide among American military personnel, or the persecution of Muslim Rohingya people in Myanmar.

Is that okay? Is it okay for me to talk about, say, racism in football and lowering infant mortality in Ethiopia? Or must we all agree to discuss only  whatever is currently the ascendant news story? Is it disrespectful to Ferguson protesters to talk about continued political oppression in Egypt now that we are no longer reblogging images of the protests in Tahrir Square? I think this is a false choice: If you are talking about Ferguson and I am talking about Ethiopian health care, neither of us is hurting the other.

I think the challenge for activists and philanthropists online is in paying sustained attention, not over days or weeks but over years and decades. And I worry that when we turn our attention constantly from one outrage to another we end up not investing the time and work to facilitate actual change. We say “THE WORLD IS WATCHING,” and it is…until it isn’t. We’ve seen this again and again in Gaza and the West Bank. We’re seeing it in Iran. We’re seeing it in South Sudan. And we’re seeing it in the U.S., from net neutrality to Katrina recovery.

The truth is, these problems are complicated, and when the outrage passes we’re left with big and tangled and nuanced problems. I feel that too often that’s when we stop paying attention, because it gets really hard and there’s always a shiny new problem somewhere else that’s merely outrageous. I hope you’re paying attention to Ferguson in five years, anon, and I hope I am, too. I also hope I’m paying attention to child death in Ethiopia. I don’t think these things are mutually exclusive.

I really don’t want to minimize the effectiveness of online activism, because I know that it works: To use a personal example, I’ve learned a TON from the LGBT+ and sexual assault survivor communities in recent years online. People on tumblr make fun of me for apologizing all the time, but I apologize all the time because I am learning all the time, and every day I’m like, “Oh, man, Current Me has realized that Previous Me was so wrong about this!”

But we can only learn when we can listen. And when you call me a hypocrite for talking about X instead of talking about Y, it makes it really hard to listen.

At times, online discourse to me feels like we just sit in a circle screaming at each other until people get their feelings hurt and withdraw from the conversation, which leaves us with ever-smaller echo chambers, until finally we’re left only with those who entirely agree with us. I don’t think that’s how the overall worldwide level of suck gets decreased.

I might be wrong, of course. I often am. But I think we have to find ways to embrace nuance and complexity online. It’s hard—very, very hard—to make the most generous, most accepting, most forgiving assumptions about others. But I also really do think it’s the best way forward.

♥ 14766 — 1 week ago on 22 Aug 2014 — via fishingboatproceeds
❝ Just six Walmart heirs have more wealth than the bottom 42 percent of Americans combined. ❞
— UC Berkeley’s Robert Reich, The Rise of the Non-Working Rich.
♥ 200 — 1 week ago on 22 Aug 2014 — via ucresearch
♥ 22686 — 1 week ago on 22 Aug 2014 — via asapscience (source)

seerofsarcasm:

persystella:

groot is probs assumed to be male but tbh i figure groot is a lil genderless being. who needs the gender binary when you’re a celestial tree creature. riddle me that.

"Are you a boy, or a girl?"
"I am Groot."

♥ 62506 — 1 week ago on 22 Aug 2014 — via lgbtlaughs (source)
alltsar:

to everyone saying “what has happened to our world”

alltsar:

to everyone saying “what has happened to our world”

♥ 188128 — 1 week ago on 19 Aug 2014 — via alltsar
❝ Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue. ❞
♥ 31036 — 1 week ago on 19 Aug 2014 — via fishingboatproceeds (source)
wefuckinglovescience:

Rare “blond” penguin spotted. Check out a video: http://bit.ly/VCY8iA

wefuckinglovescience:

Rare “blond” penguin spotted. Check out a video: http://bit.ly/VCY8iA

♥ 280 — 1 week ago on 19 Aug 2014 — via wefuckinglovescience